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natural environment. the mekong river traces an 1,100-mile path through or along the border of laos. the river has also been a barrier between laos and its neighbors. now there is a road, where before there was none. in 1994, the friendship bridge gave laos its first land link with the outside world, through thailand to the west. the bridge may symbolize a connected future, but laos in the here and now remains among the poorest countries in the world. ( rooster crows ) it is the least developed country in the lower mekong basin. life expectancy is low, about 53 years. ( rooster crows % of cn e ourished. the potential changes brought by economic development are enormous. the soil here is rich and fertile. laos remains a largely agrarian society. lowland peoples practice wet rice farming. the capital, vientiane, has a population of just half a million. the rest of the 5½ million laotians are spread over 155 million square miles of land. it'she sonlowestpulaon dena aand the least urbanized country squin the region.and. around laos lie e delopi economies of thailand, china, vietnam and
government to assess impact of the ospreys on the local environment. officials think the aircraft could harm quality of life and natural environment. >>> it looks like a large flying insect. but is actually a man made device to make disaster response more effective. and it is being used by a japanese company to reach damaged sites that are hard to reach. and to send back high revolution, resolution video images. >> it takes pictures. it can shoot a video like this. through the work of of aerial company in this prefecture. they photograph disaster areas across japan. >> translator: the unique thing is it can go places where humans cannot, take photos and gather valuable information. >> reporter: four years ago the team made this unmanned aircraft guided by remote control, it flies to locations, takes pictures and returns. at the end of march last year, the aircraft made headlines. it flew over the damaged nuclear plant in fukushima right after the disaster. from a hite of 400 meters, it took high resolution photos. this shows the first details of the damage. it provided crucial information on
, i learned on the campaign trail. there's always a winner and loser. the political environment just like the business world, is highly competitive. with every campaign season there's always a new crop of start-ups. innovation incubators. and so, i guess the campaign is a little bit of an entrepreneurial showcase. i think a lot of us think we see these ads and i guess keeping the campaign is disliked a big marketing machine that spits out the ads we see on tv and the candidates are sending mail to us an e-mail to our in box and the phone calls and so forth. but if you peel back the curtain, you might find something. a something difference you find a very complex, highly detailed operation. there's a million things happening at once. there are things happening around the candidates, there are things happening around the headquarters operations, things happening in field offices. everything from where a candidate will stay, who will stand with the candidates, what site he should choose for that and how many people should come to the event and right down to the helium in the balloons an
the environment is terrible. it's not just banks. we have done this to ourselves. we shot ourselves in the foot. get rid of the wet blanket and we will take off. there was a great article that was reprinted in "the wall street journal" giving president-elect ronald reagan some advice. tell the same positive story over and over and will turn. yet to believe in it. america usually will do the right thing after it has exhausted all other possibilities and i hope we do. if you think washington and business can go to work, the collaboration's, we should have a collaboration. we would double the other and worked round-the-clock but now and has became a war. dodd-frank, health care, so we re-litigate. we should get it right the first time and move on but we did not. >> to the extent there has been a marked absence of collaboration or friction between the worlds of politics and business, you but the lion's share on the political side? >> i would put more on the political side. everyone i know is coming down and asking what they can do for help. it surprised me when someone asked a question, do you want
in this new regulatory environment? we're confident they can. our favorite stock is goldman sachs. goldman, trading firm, market said you will never be able to beat your cost of capital in trading. well, markets are repricing. goldman is changing their trading floors. they're automating. they're cutting compensation. they're bringing inventories down in terms of getting rid of risk-weighted assets. they're doing the right stuff the other stock we like is citi. the reason we like citi because flattening yield curve is good for the mortgages they have in the bad bank. sandra: the stock is up year-to-date, 33%. jpmorgan up 25. morgan stanley 15. citigroup is the sleeper. >> vikram is doing very good job. if you think of citi, citi is a bet on continual low rates, narrowing credit spreads. that's the bad bank. but it is also a bet on the growth of the international markets. that is the good bank. that's what they're focusing on. that is nice little mix there. david: did you buy goldman down at $90? >> remember i'm an equity analyst. i can't do that. david: i'm sure you recommended to somebody.
of the deloitte cfo service. they were asked what their views are on the current operating environment. joining us with more, chief economist at deloitte. good to see you. i suppose we had a record second quarter of declines. >> confidence went through the floor back in june on the result of what's going on in the euro area. you've seen a bit of a bounce. risk appetite up is bit so i think cfos are looking at the same things the equity markets are looking at, qe-3 in the states, ecb bond buying. but the interesting thing is the underlying stock support is getting rather more defensive, they're more focused on cash. if respect. >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?f re >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?espe >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?ct. >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence?. >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence? >> so what can he can to in terms of laying confidence? >> a lot of concerns relate to things outside the uk, in particular the weakness of the euro area, uncertainty. so there are things
squaur. if you look at the product environment space, more than 100 million. this is a new business which we started over the last three, four quarters. we are opposed to have a million dollars on our platforms. if you look at client relations, we have 32 new clients in q2 and many of them in the -- segment. so if you look at the indicators, all of them indicate that our specific execution of the direction has early resistance. at the same time, we've said that we are in a challenging economic environment. but we are investing for the future. increasing our revenue from europe and integration. that is not factored into the guidance because the deal is not closed. what does all this mean? early indicators indicate that our execution is yields business. we are confident over the long term. >> your dollar averages are flat. what's going on with your customers at the moment? are they taking a lot longer to make investment decisions and is that giving you less visibility about future guidance? >> there are two parts to the answer. if you look at this quarter, 98% of our revenue came from prepa
can ask for in this environment this week. >> all right. as you can see their opinions here definitely spanning the spectrum. we'll have more of those opinions throughout the day. we'll be back here live at 8:00 japan time with the prospective from the g-7 finance ministers point of view and we'll have lots more. so do please stay with us here. >> all right. thank you very much. >>> and do come to our web site to see all the conversations ron and his team have had with top economists at the imf world bank meeting. the address is right there on the bottom of your screen. >>> now hardly any of the talks at this week's conference begins or ends without mention of europe's financial troubles. they seem to worse within each passing day. spanish leaders are facing even more complications. a u.s. credit ratings agency has downgraded the country's sovereign bonds putting them on the outskirts of junk territory. standard & poors cut spain's rating by two notches. it's gone from triple b plus to triple b minus. that's only one notch above speculative status. s & p analysts blame the downgrade on
environment. i don't think it's a sure thing we're going to have a continued recovery, but i think the chances are that we will keep going. connell: martin, thank you again for always coming on us with. dr. martin bailey with us from d.c. thank you, sir. >> thank you. dagen: california gasoline prices hitting another new record high for the state today. $4.66 a gallon. that is up 86 cents from one year ago. and california's governor jerry brown taking emergency action as the state's prices have become -- well, they are the highest in the nation. connell: they certainly are. we go right now with fox news correspondent adam housely in l.a. with the latest. >> dagen and connell, you mentioned 4.66 a gallon or so, you would be hard-pressed to find that price in much of los angeles. in fact right here behind me you can see this gas station 4.99 for regular, 5.19 for premium. just down the street, the gas there is 5.39 for regular unleaded. across los angeles, in fact, i drove down the state yesterday from northern california to southern california, no matter where you drive, you're finding gas pric
bank and under the current regulatory environment, as bank took a look at his business plan and said here is your problem -- you are asset rich and cash poor. he said i know that, if i had the cash it would not be here for a loan. he would have to over collateralize a loan by 150% under the current regulatory environment. i want him to be able to grow his business. it's a classic example of regulation killing jobs. we need to make sure we have the proper amount of legislation but not overregulation. my commercials talk about reducing spending, and powering our work force for training for jobs available and developing a comprehensive energy policy to put our people back to work, energy independence to protect our environment. >> 30 seconds to rebut. >> you have been running some of the most deceitful attack at the state has ever seen. don't try to pretend that has not been what's happening in that race. when your campaign was asked why you don't start talking about the issues, your campaign manager said it would be a senseless exercise. that's right. for linda mcmahon talking at the i
to reverse that and saying we're in an environment where banks need to lend. it's a very, very small area. it's only on new loans and the funding scheme. it's not across the board. >> if this is happening at the same time that those implementations are starting to happen, does it matter? is that a significant counter to what the individual countries may be trying to achieve? >> i think it's a contradiction between what basel 3 is trying to achieve the next three years and what the rural economies particularly in europe need. >> which is what andy said -- >> it's an interesting conversation. >> we started off on the wrong point because the good times banks boosting, and in the bad times they are able to relax. but we have got to get to the right capital levels to begin with. >> it's a bit like the inflation theme. maybe a little bit of inflation isn't so harmful to us all. suddenly we don't need an inflation target that's too strict. going to have a little bit of inflation. >> just looking at the bank of england's record, i don't think we have a strict inflation -- not strict in the sense we f
point here is that people are desperate for some kind of growth in a low-growth environment. there's a company even though it is hard to categorize that's had notable growth. here's another company that's a play on the real estate industry. still right now $32.90 to $33. >> i think it is just going to be a couple minutes, folks. bear with us. >> couple minutes, bob. >> we've got a couple of companies very much on the move. i think this linkedin. very overvalued stock on an earnings basis -- >> you like linkedin. >> you want momentum, linkedin lass it. momentum obviously trumps at times valuation. people saying that the quarter could be much better than spefktespefk expected. johnson controls looks like to be the next one that's going to not be able to make the numbers. wells fargo goes buy to hold. europe, we've totally forgotten the fact that europe -- spain did get downgraded. >> it's funny we haven't mentioned that at all today. >> isn't that incredible? that was the dominant theme in europe that perhaps this downgrade is going to cause the spanish to say, listen, we do need the
trillion of dry powder just waiting to be used. do you expect in this environment with all of the uncertainty, the fiscal cliff, all of the issues we've been talking about all morning, that you can actually put all that money to work? >> for one, it's $1 trillion has been there for quite some time. it's not all of a sudden $1 trillion. it's been there for five, six, seven years so you typically have $800 million to $1 trillion of dry powder. the uncertainty is a good thing for private equity investments. you make the most of your money when you're doing things in uncertain environments so disique qudi disequilibrium is something people like us like. >> he doesn't seem to buy that the fiscal cliff is a big issue. i don't want to overstate it. >> it's a big issue. i think it's going to be resolved. i think everyone sooner or later does what's in their best interest, to resolve this problem. >> how are all of these issues, europe, china slowdown, fiscal cliff, what's going to happen to taxes, how is that impacting the way you're think being it. >> in any given period of time o
about monetary policy and current environment and focus primarily the role of large-scale asset purchases. before doing so let me note the usual disclaim, the thoughts are about to give you are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of others on the fomc. there is a considerable diversity of views within the fomc and within, among economists more generally about the use of large-scale asset purchases, lsaps and other unconventional policy tools. this healthy given unenviable circumstances we find ourselves. let me be clear where i stand. i support the committees decision of last month, namely to initiate purchases of mortgage-backed securities, mbs, at a rate of $40 billion a month in tandem with the ongoing maturity extension program of treasury securities. and to plant a con to continue those purchases if the committee does not observe a substantial improvement in the labor market outlook. given where we are and given what we know i firmly believe this was the right decision. in my comments today, i'm only going to briefly review the kise for taking that action as tha
-- liz: so how do i informs in that atmosphere? -- invest in that atmosphere? >> in this environment we think you go with what we refer to as our barbell strategy in equities. high growth sectors like technology, financials, home builders on one side, and high yield as tony talked about on the other end, high-yield bonds, emerging market bonds, preferred. that combination, that diversified portfolio has given, you know, a nice diversified approach with steady returns in this year and solid returns, and we think that continues to be the way to go through year end. david: all right. but, david, even you, the bull in this scenario, you see a pause right now. perhaps just a momentary pause, but until we get rid of this fiscal cliff problem, etc., and you do think that we're going to deal with it, you think eventually the politicians are going to solve this problem, why don't we just take our gains right now, hold off, maybe hold these gains just for a month or so until that fiscal cliff and other problems are resolved? >> you could. if someone wants to try to time that pullback. we're down
's an understatement. but you go up and in environment, at least i was fortunately enough to where we believe that it was perfectible. you know, it's very, i think, pretty much acceptable or maybe somewhat today to be critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there were obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but it was always this unrelying -- underlying bailiff belief we were entitled -- it was the way we grew up. the nones who were immigrants who would explain it to us we were entitled as citizens of the country to be full participates. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal. it said so in the decoration of independents. there were times later on -- make remarks reciting the not so pleasant remarks and reciting the pledge of allee again or say things i think were -- not be cell phones. [laughter] people can youtube and you it's around forever. i was upset about thing. but i grew up in an environment with people around me who believed that this country could be
the political environment and the foreign policy concerns that relate to north korea. as a general rule, u.s. north korea policy follows a very similar and repetitive pattern. the provocations by the regime, missile launches, underground nuclear test or the occasional thinking of south korean boat. they are followed by threats of sanction by the international community. a lot of hand wringing. as with the child, the province of better behavior whereupon the international community comes back and provides more aid to the regime. in many respects continuing to prop up the regime. and of course, the aid that is received almost never reaches the people for whom it is delawares end. it is sei phoned off by the military. sold on the black market for hard current sei. this races several questions. i want to plant a few seeds we can come back to. four particular areas i think are worth discussing and thinking about. one is the effect, if any, of sanctions monetary sanctions on a regime like this? well, we all remember what happened about six or seven years ago when the united states froze 25 milli
earnings are not correlated with the macro environment. ubs writes that alexion is a significant double-digit growth driver but uses the orphan drug model where pricing and reimbursement are insulated, the biotech is up a whopping 400% over the past three years. keep in mind this is a speculative takeout target. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will join us to talk financials, jobs and the election, mr. obama's favorite banker. and later health care, a ma
the economy in an environment, it's difficult to reduce expenses because a lot of expenses of liquids and economic situation that one related to unemployment benefits. in terms of the financial sector, we have to address a problem of pressure, sending, a problem of capacity and a problem of governance and transparency. most of this issue aren't linked with the savings banks. by definition, they were operating with a degree of concentration with real estate, but there's a lot of albums for these things. in terms of funding, there was working with a stronger to touchÉ and with the capacity in the course of 10 minutes a weaker segment of the sector was much more effective to as a problem throughout the system overcapacity. this is at the overcapacity in the spanish financial site are we'll be in the region of 30%. in this problem is going to be address because as a result of the injection of private sector money, the process is going to take in terms of their restructuring of the sector and is going to alter banks that have been the objects of private sector money injection to restructu
? so you come into this environment. many people came in without a job. they're just volunteers and they want to get a job. some people, so they want to get noticed by the right people. and they, you know, and you have people who have been hired who want maybe more responsibility, right, and they probably traditional in their job. you have department heads who are racing against each other to maybe get a little more budget than the other and get a little more turf than the others than you might expect. you have this thing going on where it is a very chaotic time and you really need to get control of this because in this environment where there are no sort of norms, it is like building a village from scratch where everybody comes to a place with no rules, no norms, no structures, right? it's like the wild west and not everybody, you know, some people who, you know, have their own tactics for getting their own way, right? sometimes even good people lose control of their inner jerks. that is a problem early in the campaign, right? we all have them, come on. so you throw an elbow at
to require to enable america freedom of action in a very contested environment in asia and elsewhere. >> woodruff: well, we're going to have to leave it there. we know the two candidates will be debating foreign policy on october 22. thank you both for being with us. >> woodruff: you can watch all of mitt romney's speech at v.m.i. today on our web site. >> brown: still to come on the newshour, a deadly meningitis outbreak; the stem cell breakthrough; rothenburg, page, and kohut on the campaign; and salman rushdie on life under a death sentence. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the investigation into the killing of the u.s. ambassador to libya took new turns today. cbs and abc news reported american officials in libya had asked for more security personnel, but the state department refused. meanwhile, libyan officials said president obama's top counterterror advisor, john brennan, will be in libya tomorrow to discuss the investigation. a warning from congress today: u.s. companies should stop doing business with china's top two telecommunic
smith. he you may remember claimed that the bank had a toxic environment the where bankers referred to clients as muppets. the financial times is referring to an internal review found that weeks before smith's public resignation, he complained about his bonus and said he deserved to be paid more than a million dollars. the book, paid $1.5 million for the book. it's all a little -- >> we're saying it's all based on whether they call people muppets. that would be okay if you were doing -- fit's not beg bird, here we are talking about municipmuppe muppets. it's probably like not being client oriented, right? if they were doing everything for their clients but still calling them muppets, it wouldn't be an infraction, would it? >> if he was great for the clients -- >> could be a term of endearment. >> if i called you a muppet, how would you feel? >> i'm not one of those old guys in the balcony. i like those guys. andrew, what are the chances that braunstein goes to goldman and vineyard goes to jpmorgan zero. >> its it's like a wife swapping thing. >> vineyard is going to california to re
or midpart of the novel to generationly maybe a more of a focus on the urban environment in the latest stages of the novel. but in so doing he demonstrates a little bit less familiarity with that slice of contemporary chinese life and i think these younger writers are probably more in their -- you might say native habitat when they're writing about these. >> brown: xiao qiang, a brief word on that? how this fits into contemporary writing? >> i think it's very interesting to see how the chinese state media lauded about his receiving this award. in contrast with the former two chinese, as you mentioned, that one is gao xingjian, in exile, the government doesn't approve his politics and the other is liu jiabao. mo yan is his pen name. and his pen name means "don't speak q. sots there's a popular internet joke saying "who is the first chinese winner of a nobel prize? don't speak. who's the second chinese nobel piece prize winner? don't speak. who's the third one? don't speak. this one is mo yan. but two other people are being banned and the chinese official media and chinese internet. >> pelley:
for the next 10 years. >> if you think about economic environment in this country. >> we don't want to let that happen here. >> to make a case you're trying to make him he picked a terrible time to do it. unemployment is 8.3%. how can you make this argument about immigration? >> how can you win in this environment? that's what i mask them. >> it's like how can you make an investment when times are tough? new york city walked away from his future back in the 70s. they did make an investment in infrastructure maintenance or anything because the economy was bad. i missed it decades to work their way out of it. if you go look at history in america when great things were done, the central park on the empire state building, things that start at the bottom of the recession. there is a guy, barnett, not barnett. he asked out by p. larry barnett -- gary barnett. everyone thinks he's crazy. he's been building for the low prices another cinemas demand. he just sold the top two floors and $90 million apiece and he stopped selling them because he can't keep up with the demand. it's got to wait until pr
political environment. but at the same time, you spent years as the democratic party chair, in some ways, being the partisan chief of the party. what would you say to virginians that would convince them that when you go to washington, you'd be not partisan and not simply a loyal lieutenant in harry reid's army. >> i will tell you two things. i served with two presidents. i serve with president bush and president obama. we did not agree on everything. i worked closely on the bush administration on a number of issues that put virginia first. railroads are being built right now largely because of president bush and his secretary of transportation and our ability to work together. we worked with the bush administration in the aftermath of the shootings at virginia tech. i will always be a partner of the nine states, whoever the president is. i also have a track record of working across lines. first, here in richmond. second, as a republican -- as a governor with republican houses. we were the best-managed state in virginia. revested for business all years i was governor, forbes magazine. tho
for the next move higher? is it india specific, global growth? >> both. i think the environment for policy makers in india has become much more forgiving. i think better bernanke will try to ease their concerns about quantitative easing and inflation, but it will make investors much more interested. there's also been --quantitativ inflation, but it will make investors much more interested. there's also been --to ease the quantitative easing and inflation, but it will make investors much more interested. there's also been --ease their quantitative easing and inflation, but it will make investors much more interested. there's also been -- what surprised them was how little money moved out. we saw very little selling in stocks by foreigners. that money has all come back in now. a the lot of sovereign wealth money that comes in and i think people are buying the long term growth story of a country that is very young and still growing. so if policies stick from here on out, i think that the economy will do a lot better. but investors will be looking to see that, they'll want to see some traction
, they are helping the environment. when you live in a golden state, dealing with prices over $5 a gallon are not making people happy. jenna: jon is going to send you a check so you can make sure you can get to work. adam, nice to see you as always. >> reporter: you guys make the big money. jenna: thank you, adam, talk to you soon. jon: i notice there is a prius at the pump. jenna: did you see that in the red prius. jon: even the hybrids are having to pay the 5-dollar-plus prices. one presidential candidate gaining ground in a key battleground state. we will bring you the latest numbers. in one state police bust a bomb plot aimed at several churches. why the suspect's family says they are relieved he is under arrest. we'll have some of the details of his plan ahead. humans -- sometimes life trips us up. and sometimes, we trip ourselves up, but that's okay. at liberty mutual insurance we can "untrip" you as you go through your life with personalized policies and discounts when you need them most. just call... and speak with a licensed representative about saving on your policy when you get
. if there is demand, that means the housing environment is better. many more people are needing to rent housing than in the recent past. maybe we are getting to more normal balance between people for whom buying a home makes sense and those for whom it's not the right decision at this time. so that has put a lot more pressure on rents and rental prices. rents are going up. that's really a problem at lower incomes where people are competing with a new group of people who have more money to spend and rents going up means a real problem for very low-income people. host: we talk about assistance and breaks for home buyers, but what about renters? what kind of assistance is out there for them? guest: we do have a public housing system and we have vouchers and other such assistance for individuals of low-income. only about a quarter of the people eligible for those programs actually are able to get the benefit. not because they don't qualify but because tre is just not enough money be appropriated to pay for it. host: here's a story in usa today this morning -- what does this mean for home buyers and sell
america and the world create an environment where whoever is in authority and power have to act or pay the price. >> i am optimistic. i do not think the american people will settle for anything less than success, and they are going to drive this debate. as business leaders, our job is to insure the business community is involved in the discussion. if they are, politicians will do the right thing. >> to you think american politicians will do what is needed? >> you will not find pessimist'' up here. we would not do what we do for a living. the problems we face can be solved. americans can be counted on to do the right thing after they have exhausted every other possibility. we would get it done. >> you can never go wrong ending on churchill. thank you for joining me. [applause] >> thank you all for joining us for conversations and power today, and a big thank-you to a keen observer on washington politics and the economy, as well who as a great moderator. and thank you to our panelists. we really appreciate you all being here. i would also like to again thank our sponsors at bloomberg gov
. is that going to be easy because when you have the economy in a recessionary environment it's very difficult to increase revenues and is very difficult to reduce the expenses because a lot of expenses are linked with the macroeconomics situation. in terms of the financial sector we had to address a problem of real-estate -- real funding, the capacity and corporate governance and transparency. most of this issue is linked with the saving banks because by definition this saving banks were operating with real-estate that was where the degree of concentration that creates a lot of problems for these banks. in terms of funding there was also a problem because there was us light problem to work with some of the institutions, the capacity, the cost of funding of this week's segment of the sector, much more effective. it was a problem for the system over capacity. the overcapacity in the spanish financial sector, the region of 30%, and this problem is going to be addressed because as a result of the injection of public sector money, the process is going to take in terms of the restructuring of the s
and a regulatory environment where businesses can flourish. but it doesn't do much more. right now we have a federal government that is far too large, $16 trillion of debt, $1.3 trillion deficit. we need somebody who will stand up and fight. i have that record in the house. that's the record i will take to the senate. that's what i would appreciate your vote, and thank you. >> our next closing statement is from marc victor. >> ladies and gentlemen, our country was founded upon freedom. we are about individual rights and responsibilities. we are about free markets. we are about being free to both defined and pursue your own happiness. it's about americans being in charge of themselves. these are the principles that made us a great nation, but we have strayed so far from these principles. we have a busybody government that is into everything. it regulates, taxes everything and everyone literally to death. it's involved in our lives cradle-to-grave. over 16 trillion in debt now and going ever higher. highest incarceration rate in the world. over 2 million in prison. perpetual wars that we kee
that we have an environment where we can create more -- bernie hasn't got to work a day the rest of his life, bernie and billy are having a wonderful life, god bless this man, he's spending his time and his money getting the message out. we know how to create jobs. we've created them. the point i'm making is the taxes will go up when you have a bigger work base. >> right, and that -- >> that's what he's betting on. >> it's a supply side argument and anyway, we got to run because we have mr. mccain coming up. >> oh, good. >> we do. mitt romney says the middle east has become a more dangerous place during the obama administration. he made his remarks in what his campaign called a major foreign policy speech yesterday in virginia, joining us now is more, senator john mccain, joins us from raleigh, north carolina, where he's campaigning for governor romney. in a nutshell, senator, summarize the points that governor romney made that you think are most spot-on in terms of talking about the middle east and where we are right now. >> well, first of all, could i tell bernie now that he's recover
guys trying to get at you. and it's a hurried environment. >> but sometimes what might motivate someone if they thought that you were thinking about it. you just want to bolster his confidence. >> no, not bolstering his confidence. we think he's that good. he is that good. i wouldn't look at the numbers too seriously, 31 or 28. a quarterback's job ultimately is to win games. and mark sanchez has proven he can do that. and he can -- like he pulled out a game a few weeks ago at the last couple of minutes and played miami. that was an ugly game. >> you think the jets can beat some of the best teams in the league? >> i think we were very competitive in the last game. >> we were in there all the way to the end, we made some, a little few mistakes and that cost the game. >> -- tebow next year too? >> yeah, absolutely. he'll be with us for three years. and i think he's going to have -- he's going to be a real asset in helping us win games. >> do you know? is he still a virgin? >> i don't really go into that. >> just, you know, inquiring minds want to know. >> inquiring minds want to know. >> n
say make us safer and stronger in this new threatened environment is very curious. i think it does have something to do with them as i started, with a vision that the governor has. if your vision of what's happening in the world is driven by russia's strategic threat and you want to confront china on day one and you want to confront the states, and you want to be hunkered down in the middle east while these transnational threats and substate actors are hitting is very hard, then that's a totally different approach, i agree. if you want to be where the president has been, which is very aggressive against al qaeda, supporting the democratic and moderate forces, during the transitions in afghanistan and iraq, frankly to lighten our burden in the middle east, so we could move into confront other threats of the world. it is a faster, more agile, it is a smarter, tougher and stronger approach. one has to look at the previous administrations. if that's what people want in their security process going forward, they can have it again because it sounds exactly like what it does, is suggestin
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